Posts

What Makes Ireland the Ultimate Data Centre Capital of Europe?

Originally posted on Silicon Republic We regularly hear that Ireland has established itself as the ‘data capital of Europe’ with many of the world’s largest tech companies basing data centres here, but what exactly do we know about them? Click to read our complete collection of Data Week features Ronan Harris, head of Google Ireland, recently described the country as the data capital of Europe and, going by industry reports, it’s hard to disagree. Specifically, a detailed report published by global data analyst group 451 Advisors in 2013 predicted that Ireland’s data centre industry would overtake UK and mainland Europe locations with a growth rate of 18pc over the coming years.

What makes a good data centre?

One of the key factors why Ireland is seen as a good location to establish vast warehouses full of servers is down to the cold weather that many of us complain about on a regular basis. Additionally, you’ll find most Irish data centres clustered along the M50 motorway, which mirrors the route of the T50 fibre trunking system running from north to west Dublin. Click to find out more about Inspirefest 2016 While cooling and connectivity are essential for operations, there are other technical standards that comprise Irish, and indeed, any data centres. For example, square footage and energy usage contributes to what standard a data centre finds itself in. One such standard scrutinised by potential clients is power usage effectiveness (PUE), which divides the total facility energy into its IT equipment energy with the most ideal score being 1.0. To close out Data Week, Siliconrepublic.com has compiled available information on 33 multinational and indigenous companies hosting data in Ireland. To read the full article, view it on the Silicon Republic website here.

“Ireland, Data’s Gateway to Europe” Event to Converge Leading Authorities on EU-US Data Protection

By: Garry Connolly, President & Founder of Host in Ireland Secure data transmission is critical when hosting digital assets abroad, especially in a time when data breaches run rampant and threats grow more sophisticated with each passing day. Of equal importance is the notion of corporations respecting individuals’ right to privacy and protecting their personal data as information is transferred from country to country. To regulate the way that U.S. companies exported and handled the personal data of European citizens, the United States Department of Commerce and the European Union established the Safe Harbor policy agreement in November 2000. However, due to concerns surrounding American government authorities gaining access to Europeans’ online information, it was deemed invalid by the European Court of Justice in its ruling on October 6, 2015. As a response to the invalidation of the Safe Harbor Framework, the European Commission and United States recently agreed upon the EU-US Privacy Shield, a new framework for transatlantic data transmission. This change will directly affect many companies hosting internationally, and as the Privacy Shield remains under analysis by the European Commission’s Article 29 Working party, data transfer has become somewhat of an intricate process. Until the EU completes its analysis, related complaints are being dealt with on a case-by-case basis and outside transfer mechanisms, such as Standard Contractual Clauses and Binding Corporate Rules, are being utilized in the interim to transfer data to the U.S. Though international data protection grows increasingly complex, Ireland is well- prepared to provide companies with the necessary resources to maintain compliance and succeed in their international hosting endeavors. As a superior hosting location, Ireland attracts companies of all sizes and markets thanks to its representation of the five fundamental principles of digital asset hosting: Policy, Pedigree, People, Power and Pipes, or the 5 Ps. With the recent uncertainty surrounding EU-US data protection, understanding the nuances of compliance is critical to remaining competitive, and Host in Ireland has made it their mission to help companies navigate these shifting waters by converging some of the leading authorities in the field to address the topic at its “Ireland, Data’s Gateway to Europe” event. Featuring a special presentation by Ireland’s Data Protection Commissioner, Helen Dixon, this marquee event, taking place at the Embassy of Ireland in Washington D.C. on April 6, 2016 from 6:00 – 9:00 pm, will examine the changing data protection landscape throughout Europe as well as EU-US Safe Harbor framework and EU-US Privacy Shield updates. In addition to Ms. Dixon, additional featured speakers at “Ireland, Data’s Gateway to Europe” include Emmanuel Dowdall, Executive VP/Director North America at IDA Ireland, Buddy Rizer, Executive Director of Loudoun County’s Department of Economic Development and Garry Connolly, President and Founder of Host in Ireland. If you would like to register for this event free of charge, please contact marketing@hostinireland.com. If you are interested in learning more about the Host in Ireland initiative, visit www.hostinireland.com.  

Ireland needs to defend its position in Europe’s digital future

From Safe Harbour and Privacy Shield to Facebook and Apple’s tax affairs, Ireland is at the centre of the digital battlefield of Europe whether it wants to be or not. The decisions we make and actions we take will sum up our character in the eyes of our European neighbours, writes John Kennedy. From our remote outcrop on Europe’s westernmost fringe, you would think we would be shielded from pivotal events, like war, etc, but because of the universal nature of the world’s digital economy, Ireland is on the frontline. In fact, we are at the very centre of the world in digital matters due to geography and industrial policy, and it’s time to show some responsibility and backbone. Read more

Interxion announces third datacentre in Dublin

European datacentre company Interxion, has announced an initial investment of approximately €28 million to construct the first two phases of its third datacentre in Dublin (DUB3). Developed in response to continued customer demand, this new datacentre will be located in Grange Castle Business Park.
When fully constructed, DUB3 will provide a total of approximately 2,300 sq m of equipped space in four phases and total customer-available power of approximately 5MW. DUB3 will provide access to 40+ carriers and ISPs, as well as INEX, the Irish Internet Exchange, whose core node is based at Interxion’s existing Dublin data centre campus. Read more

The European Code of Conduct for Energy Efficiency in Data Centre: Towards a Low Carbon Europe

Screen Shot 2016-02-09 at 4.18.07 PM

The European Code of Conduct for Data Centres programme is a voluntary initiative managed by the Joint Research Centre (JRC), the European Commission’s in-house science service. The Code addresses primarily data centre owners and operators, and secondly the supply chain and service providers.

  The energy saving focus of the Code of Conduct covers two main areas: 1. IT Load - this relates to the consumption of the IT equipment in the data centre. 2. Facilities Load - this relates to the mechanical and electrical systems that support the IT electrical load. Screen Shot 2016-02-09 at 4.17.49 PM

The Data Centres Code of Conduct has been created in response to increasing energy consumption in data centres and the need to reduce the related environmental, economic and energy supply impacts. The aim is to inform and stimulate operators and owners to reduce energy consumption in a cost-effective manner without hampering the critical function of data centres. Providing a platform to bring together European stakeholders to discuss and agree voluntary actions which will improve energy efficiency following European conditions such as the climate and energy markets regulations.

Read more

Ireland remains fastest-growing economy in Europe

New European Commission forecast expects Irish unemployment levels to fall further

Ireland has retained its status as the European Union’s fastest-growing economy, according to European Commission forecasts published this morning.

The Commission’s triannual analysis of the EU’s 28 economies predicts that Irish gdp (gross domestic product) will grow by 4.5 per cent this year, before slowing to 3.5 per cent in 2017.

Following growth of 6.9 per cent in 2015, Ireland continues to be the fastest-growing economy in Europe. The projected growth rate of 4.5 per cent in 2016 leaves Ireland just ahead of Malta and Luxembourg in terms of gdp growth, with 1.8 per cent growth forecast in the euro zone’s largest economy, Germany, 1.3 per cent for France, and 2.1 per cent in Britain.

Read more

Facebook’s Second European Data Center Is Coming To Ireland

Posted by Facebook today officially announced that it plans to open its second European data center in Clonee, Ireland. The town, which sits right outside of Dublin will play host to Facebook’s sixth data center overall. Construction will start soon and the new facility will go online sometime in late 2017 or early 2018. Facebook’s first European data center opened in Luela, Sweden back in 2013. When that facility went live, Facebook stressed how it would be able to run it on 100 percent renewable energy and use “the chilly Nordic air” to cool it. In Ireland, Facebook will also only use renewable energy to power the new data center. Read more

Interview with Gary Keogh about Digital Realty’s Dublin expansion

logo-digital-realtyDigital Realty sales director Gary Keogh explains why Digital Realty is expanding its data centre facilities at Profile Park in west Dublin as part of a major €150m investment. As part of a €150m investment, which was first announced last year, Digital Realty will add approximately 10,000 sq ft of data centre technical space to complement its current and fully-occupied approximately 10,000 sq ft data centre hall at Profile Park in Dublin. Read more

Zayo to Acquire Viatel

Acquisition to cement Zayo as a leading Pan-European infrastructure provider

LONDON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Zayo Group Holdings, Inc. (“Zayo”) (NYSE: ZAYO), a leading provider of bandwidth infrastructure and network-neutral colocation and connectivity services, today announced it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Viatel’s infrastructure and non-Irish enterprise businesses. Viatel is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Digiweb Group, a full service telecommunications and managed services operator, based in Dublin, Ireland. The purchase price is approximately €95 million. The Viatel acquisition will provide Zayo with Pan-European intercity and metro fiber capability via an 8,400 kilometer fiber network across eight countries. The transaction will add 12 new metro networks, seven data centers and connectivity to 81 on-net buildings. Two wholly-owned subsea cable systems will provide connectivity on two of Europe’s busiest routes – London-Amsterdam and London-Paris. The Viatel businesses to be acquired are highly aligned with Zayo’s existing product and customer set, including a higher proportion of dark fiber revenue. Originally posted on Business Wire. To read this article in its entirety, please click here: Read More